Contamination

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Paint Contamination

There are many forms of paint contamination that infect the finish of automobiles.   Paint contamination is something that can adhere or embed into the paint finish and cause a diminished appearance.  Some contaminants can be removed with regular cleaning methods, however most cannot.  Although bugs, tree sap, paint overspray and light road tar are common forms of paint contamination, the most recent that are seriously infecting the paint finish is rail dust, brake dust and industrial fallout.  

Note:  The longer that these contaminants are left untreated, the more damage they create, and the harder they are to remove.


  Rail dust contamination
2train.jpg (34800 bytes)
  • caused from metal on metal friction of the rail wheel and the railroad track
  • disbursed onto the paint finish of all automobiles
  • cannot be removed using "current" cleaning methods
  • 70% of new vehicles transported by rail, thus infected in earliest stage
  • vehicles are infected anytime they are traveling, or parked near a railroad
  • serious damage occurs when left untreated
Rail dust is produced from the friction of the rail wheels against the railroad track.   The friction caused, disburses tiny particles of metal that can cause serious damage to the paint finish.  Currently over 70% of new vehicles are transported throughout the country using the railway system, therefore, most new vehicles are infected with this contamination.  The railroad is still a very dominant part of transportation, therefore there are many instances where a vehicle comes into contact with rail dust contamination.  Anytime a vehicle is traveling or parked near a railroad, it is subjected to rail dust contamination. 

Brake dust contamination

2rotor.jpg (33179 bytes)
  • caused from metal on metal friction of the brake pad and the rotor
  • disbursed onto the paint finish of all automobiles
  • cannot be removed using "current" cleaning methods
  • all vehicles now have metallic brake pads, therefore every vehicle on the road is infected with brake dust
  • serious damage occurs when left untreated
Brake dust is produced from the friction during braking.  Brake dust is disbursed into the air, and onto the paint finish of all vehicles.  In recent years the formulation of brake pads have changed from asbestos material to metal or metallic material.  Actually, these new "metallic" brake pads are tiny particles of bare metal compressed into the mold of a brake pad.  During braking the brake pad is compressed against the rotor.  Since both of these materials are made of metal, brake dust is now in the form of metal shavings that adhere and embed into the paint finish.  Since all vehicles have metallic brake pads, there is no vehicle that can escape brake dust contamination.

Industrial fallout contamination

refinery.jpg (33664 bytes)
  • caused from pollution
  • disbursed onto the paint finish of all automobiles
  • cannot be removed using "current" cleaning methods
  • areas with heavy industrial activity, disburse more fallout
  • serious damage occurs when left untreated
Industrial fallout is a general term that is used to describe pollution.  This can come from many sources such as vehicle exhaust and factory emissions and is eventually settling onto the paint finish of vehicles.  Areas with heavy industrial activity are obviously disbursing more industrial fallout. 

Actual photo

Copy of 2b1.jpg (16019 bytes)
  • what contaminants look like on white vehicle
  • adhere and embed to the paint finish
  • give the finish a rough or gritty feeling
  • easily visible on white finish with naked eye
  • insect shows size comparison
This is an actual photo that shows what the paint contamination looks like on a white vehicle.  The insect in the photo is used to show a relative size to the contaminants and confirms the ability to see them with the naked eye.  On darker colored vehicles, the contaminants can be easily detected by simply feeling the finish.  These contaminants give the paint finish a rough, or gritty feeling.

 

stg1.jpg (12147 bytes) Stage 1-This is used to describe the nature of the contaminants and how they can penetrate and adhere to the paint finish in the early stages of contamination.  Note: at this stage, Erazerô "clay like" cleaning material can easily remove this contamination.
stg2.jpg (12188 bytes) Stage 2-This illustration shows the next stage after initial contamination.  Since these contaminants re actually tiny particles of bare metal, they begin to rust with the slightest bit of moisture.  As they begin to rust, they are causing more damage to the paint finish, and forming a  "rust bond" with the paint.  At this stage, on white vehicles they can easily be noticed as tiny rust particles.  Note: at this stage, Erazerô "clay like" cleaning material can easily remove this contamination.
sg3.jpg (19757 bytes) Stage 3- This illustration is used to show what happens to the paint finish when these contaminants are not removed.  As they continue to rust, they are actually eating away at the paint finish and eventually create a passage for corrosion to get beneath the surface. Note: at this stage, Erazerô "clay like" surface cleaning material will not remove contamination.  At this point, the paint finish has been seriously damaged and in need of extensive repair.